July 24, 2014
"To begin with, you need to write. This seems axiomatic because it is. The only way to amass a pile of words into a book is to shovel some every single day. No days off. You have to form this habit; without it you are screwed. I’m going to assume everyone who keeps reading already has this down. If you don’t — you won’t make it. My best advice on how to form this habit is twofold: Get comfortable staring at a blank screen and not writing. This is a skill. If you can not write and avoid filling that time with distractions, you’ll get to the point where you start writing. Open your manuscript and just be with it."

Hugh Howey, author of the famous Wool series, offers his advice to aspiring writers – a fine addition to our ongoing archive of writing advice.

For the ultimate resource, see the famous writers’ collected advice on writing. And for empirical evidence of this rain-or-shine approach to writing, see the daily routines of great authors

(via explore-blog)

July 23, 2014

nevver:

No shit, Wayne White

July 23, 2014
iamjapanese:

Zhao Shao’ang(赵少昂 Chinese, 1905-1998)
via

iamjapanese:

Zhao Shao’ang(赵少昂 Chinese, 1905-1998)

via

(Source: wangchangzhengb.blog.163.com, via randombeautysls)

July 23, 2014
design-is-fine:

John Vassos, portable phonograph RCA Victor Special, 1937. Aluminium. RCA Manufacturing Company, USA. Via Wolfsonian

design-is-fine:

John Vassos, portable phonograph RCA Victor Special, 1937. Aluminium. RCA Manufacturing Company, USA. Via Wolfsonian

(via mudwerks)

July 23, 2014

wjs59:

Tom Waits and Cassandra (Elvira) Peterson; shot by Joel Brodsky

(via hyacinth-house)

July 23, 2014

sarahj-art:

Happy Batman Day!

July 23, 2014
explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

July 23, 2014
foxesinbreeches:

Lisa from Eros by Timothy White

foxesinbreeches:

Lisa from Eros by Timothy White

July 23, 2014
theniftyfifties:

Detail from a 1952 Van Heusen sport shirt advertisement.

theniftyfifties:

Detail from a 1952 Van Heusen sport shirt advertisement.

(Source: rogerwilkerson)

July 18, 2014
whataboutbobbed:

Colleen Moore, popular motion picture star, is very fond of dogs, and particularly of the big Saint Bernard that appears with her above.  Miss Moore began her screen career at the age of fifteen.  The first picture in which she made an outstanding hit was Flaming Youth.  There followed in rapid succession stellar roles in such important productions as So Big, Sally, Irene and Twinkletoes.  She was born in Michigan, but grew up in Tampa, Florida.  In private life she is Mrs John E McCormick
Miss Moore is seen here in the charming flagged garden of her home in the Wilshire section of Los Angeles
Despite her busy career as a First National Star, Colleen Moore often finds time for her favorite game of tennis
photographs by Henry Freulich

whataboutbobbed:

Colleen Moore, popular motion picture star, is very fond of dogs, and particularly of the big Saint Bernard that appears with her above.  Miss Moore began her screen career at the age of fifteen.  The first picture in which she made an outstanding hit was Flaming Youth.  There followed in rapid succession stellar roles in such important productions as So Big, Sally, Irene and Twinkletoes.  She was born in Michigan, but grew up in Tampa, Florida.  In private life she is Mrs John E McCormick

Miss Moore is seen here in the charming flagged garden of her home in the Wilshire section of Los Angeles

Despite her busy career as a First National Star, Colleen Moore often finds time for her favorite game of tennis

photographs by Henry Freulich

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