August 28, 2014

fissurina:

The Forgotten 1950s Girl Gang

No idea if this photo set is already here somewhere…it likely is…but this is a bit rad…
full article here: http://www.messynessychic.com/2013/02/10/the-forgotten-1950s-girl-gang/
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You might have heard of the Teddy Boys, a 1950s rebel youth subculture in Britain characterized by an unlikely style of dress inspired by Edwardian dandies fused with American rock’n roll. They formed gangs from East London to North Kensington and became high profile rebels in the media. But an important sub-subculture of the Teddy Boys, an unlikely female element, has remained all but invisible from historical records. Meet The Teddy Girls.

These are one of just a few known collections of documented photographs of the first British female youth culture ever to exist. In 1955, freelance photographer Ken Russell was introduced Josie Buchan, a Teddy Girl who introduced him to some of her friends. Russell photographed them and one other group in Notting Hill.

After his photographs were published in a small magazine in 1955, Russell’s photographs remained unseen for over half a century. He became a successful film director in the meantime. In 2005, his archive was rediscovered, and so were the Teddy Girls.

Russell remembers 14 year-old Teddy Girl, Jean Rayner: “She had attitude by the truckload. No one paid much attention to the teddy girls before I did them, though there was plenty on teddy boys. They were tough, these kids, they’d been born in the war years and food rationing only ended in about 1954 – a year before I took these pictures. They were proud. They knew their worth. They just wore what they wore.”

To understand the Teddy Girls style, we first have to go back to the boys culture. They emerged in England as post-war austerity was coming to an end and working class teenagers were able to afford good clothes and began to adopt the upper class Saville Row revival of dandy Edwardian fashion. By the mid 1950s, second-hand Edwardian suits were readily available on sale in markets as they had become unwearable by the upper-class once the Teddy Boys had started sporting them. The Teds, as they called themselves, wore long drape jackets, velvet collars, slim ties and began to pair the look with thick rubber-soled creeper shoes and the ‘greaser’ hairstyles of their American rock’n’roll idols.

Despite their overall gentlemanly style of dress (certainly compared to today), the Teddys were a teenage youth culture out to shock their parents’ generation, and quickly became associated with trouble by the media.

Teddy girls were mostly working class teens as well, but considered less interesting by the media who were more concerned with sensationalizing a violent working class youth culture. While Teddy boys were known for hanging around on street corners, looking for trouble, a young working class woman’s role at the time was still focused around the home.

But even with lower wages than the boys, Teddy girls would still dress up in their own drape jackets, rolled-up jeans, flat shoes, tailored jackets with velvet collars and put their feminine spin on the Teddy style with straw boater hats, brooches, espadrilles and elegant clutch bags. They would go to the cinema in groups and attend dances and concerts with the boys, collect rock’n’roll records and magazines. Together, they essentially cultivated the first market for teenage leisure in Britain.

In the end it was the troublesome reputation of the Teddy Boys that got the better of this youth subculture. Most of the violence and vandalism was exaggerated by the media, but there were notably a few gangs that chose a darker path.

(via hyacinth-house)

August 28, 2014

whataboutbobbed:

crowds sitting in Chicago, Illinois, watching the Graf Zeppelin (navigated by Dr Hugo Eckener) fly over the city on August 28, 1929

August 28, 2014

nprfreshair:

The Simpsons + Mondrian + Wine 

"Wine, or maybe not? is a playful, minimalist wine bottle design project that will bring a smile to your face. Inspired by the style of famous Dutch painter Pieter Mondrian, the collaborative project was developed by Russian artist Constantin Bolimond and Dmitry Patsukevich in 1987, the same year The Simpsons first aired on The Tracey Ullman Show. And, the contents of the bottle have remained a mystery ever since.” 

Here’s our recent Simpsons tribute

August 28, 2014
nevver:

Look what the tide brought in

nevver:

Look what the tide brought in

August 7, 2014

amandapalmer:

"For 40 years, I’ve photographed myself on my birthday wearing nothing but my white Lollipop underpants, shoes and socks. I made my first Birthday Suit self-portrait in Death Valley, CA in 1974.

Without fail, I’ve faced my camera every April 22nd since then to create a coded history of one woman’s journey through time…”

this is so incredibly wonderful. go look at the entire set of self-portrait photos by Lucy Hilmer

https://www.lensculture.com/articles/lucy-hilmer-birthday-suits

(thanks to Olga Nunes for this link via email)

August 6, 2014
nprfreshair:

The more complex our personal technology gets, the more eager television is to take advantage of it. In the case of interactive TV, that now means the ability to vote on contestants and otherwise effect the outcome of what transpires shows – often in real time. But as our TV critic David Bianculli notes, this new “interactive” wrinkle actually is as old as television itself. In fact, even older.
Listen to the piece and follow along with images here.

nprfreshair:

The more complex our personal technology gets, the more eager television is to take advantage of it. In the case of interactive TV, that now means the ability to vote on contestants and otherwise effect the outcome of what transpires shows – often in real time. But as our TV critic David Bianculli notes, this new “interactive” wrinkle actually is as old as television itself. In fact, even older.

Listen to the piece and follow along with images here.

August 6, 2014
nprfreshair:

Time for that second cup of coffee… 

photo by maddieonthings

nprfreshair:

Time for that second cup of coffee…

photo by maddieonthings

August 2, 2014
Erin Morgenstern

writeplacewritetime:

image

This is, alas, not a proper office. This is a windowless writing cave in an apartment I moved into last year and I will be vacating by the time 2013 rolls around. It is a temporary space, teeny but functional and thanks to Black Phoenix Trading Post it smells like mahogany and teakwood…

August 2, 2014
Laurie Halse Anderson

writeplacewritetime:

I got serious about my writing twenty years ago. Since then I’ve written in a closet, in an attic, in a basement, on the front seat of the car, at basketball and soccer and swim practices, in more hotels than I’d like to remember, and for two memorable years whilst living in a small apartment,…

August 1, 2014
nevver:

A real pleasure

nevver:

A real pleasure

(Source: twitter.com)

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